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The Deal with Acupuncture for Weight Loss

By Sara Calabro

From diets and support groups to surgically implanted devices, weight-loss solutions abound—and yet consistently leave something to be desired.

For every Weight Watchers success story there’s a case of backfire, in which Points counting becomes so tedious and joyless that it only increases cravings for off-the-charts foods. The same Lap-Band that improves portion control in one person may be nothing but an ineffective and unnecessary surgical procedure for another.

Different weight-loss methods produce unpredictable outcomes because we all gain weight, and struggle to lose it, for different reasons.

Acupuncture by nature is multi-pronged in its approach—it simultaneously addresses physiological and emotional imbalances—making it an especially suitable therapy for complex conditions that are difficult to isolate.

And so, The $64,000 Question: Can acupuncture really help with weight loss?

Ear Acupuncture for Weight Loss

Ear points are the best-known acupuncture approach to weight loss. The ear in acupuncture is a microcosm of the whole body, so ear points can be effective at treating conditions that involve multiple systems.

Weight-loss acupuncture treatments usually involve some combination of the following ear points: Shen Men and Sympathetic, which reduce anxiety and calm the nervous system; Endocrine, which addresses potential hormone imbalances and affects metabolism; the Hunger point, which point curbs food cravings; and the Stomach point, which targets one of the primary organs involved in digestion.

The story of acupuncture and weight loss, however, does not end at the ear.

Let’s think about popular mainstream weight-loss options: It’s not surprising that Lap-Band surgery doesn’t work for everyone. You can reduce someone’s stomach capacity to the size of an acorn but that does nothing to affect his desire to eat. Similarly, Weight Watchers’ Points system and support groups go a long way in addressing the emotional aspect of weight loss. But if a hormone imbalance is affecting appetite and metabolism, or a digestive disturbance is making it difficult to excrete waste, weight is unlikely to come off.

Acupuncture differs in that it considers the whole picture. However, not everyone’s picture looks the same, which is why ear weight-loss protocols don’t always work.

There is usually an anxiety-related component to overeating, and often an addictive quality to that behavior. Depression leading to lethargy and lack of motivation to exercise may be involved as well.

But why is the anxiety happening? Where is the depression or the hormone imbalance coming from?

Although effective a large percentage of the time, ear points for weight loss are not always enough to get at the root of the problem. Fortunately, acupuncturists have additional tools at their disposal.

‘Burning’ Off Weight

One example of a non-ear approach to weight loss is found in Applied Channel Theory in Chinese Medicine, a fascinating and highly readable book by Wang Ju-Yi and Jason Robertson.

The authors discuss body weight in relation to what’s known as the Shao Yang system, which encompasses the Triple Burner and Gallbladder organs and channels.

They say, “Shao yang pathology revolves around the concept that, when regulation is compromised, heat and qi become clumped in the interior.” This “clumping” can manifest as excess weight.

Detailed discussion of the Triple Burner is beyond the scope of this article. But as it relates to the topic of weight loss, the Triple Burner traditionally refers to three parts of the abdomen that regulate the environment surrounding the organs. (Those interested in a thorough description of the Triple Burner should read Wang and Robertson’s book.)

With that in mind, the Applied Channel authors make the following clinical observation:

“The fact that the greater omentum (a part of the peritoneal lining that surrounds the organs) actually drapes over the lower abdomen and often has large deposits of fatty tissue provides insight into why the shao yang channel is important in the treatment of obesity.”

The Triple Burner’s role as a regulator and transformer means it also is important for metabolism, affecting the process of how waste is removed from the cells. Similarly, its paired organ and channel, the Gallbladder, affects the removal of waste through digestion. The Gallbladder “makes decisions” about what the body holds onto and what it excretes.

Applied Channel discusses this in relation to Liver Qi Stagnation, an extremely common pattern seen in acupuncture clinics:

“Many cases of liver qi stasis are actually related to a kind of yang deficiency. In these more deficient cases, there is often a corresponding gallbladder qi deficiency….The net result is a compromise of the decision-making function of the gallbladder in the digestive system….[causing] inefficient digestion. This may involve…over-absorption of foods, leading to ever-increasing weight gain.”

This Shao Yang pathology is just one of many that can cause weight retention. But it exemplifies how acupuncture—in contrast to many more popular weight-loss options, for which outcomes are often temporary or altogether unsuccessful—addresses the underlying reasons for why someone may be having trouble losing weight.

Acupuncture can help with weight loss, but accurate diagnosis is critical, particularly in complicated cases for which ear protocols prove inadequate.

Photo by Sara Calabro

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Comments

Chris Primavera
Reply

In reading the article about weight loss, I was wondering if liver qi stasis could be responsible for high cholesterol.
I really enjoyed both of these pieces about digestion and weight loss. I will ask my acupuncturist about Triple Burner and refer her to Wang and Robertson’s book.
Good,reader/patient friendly information about acupuncture is not easy to find. Thank you for this site.

Duke Bunsen
Reply

Do you have any research references backing up your statement that acupuncture can help with weight loss? I’m curious in how this works out in controlled studies.

Sara
Reply

Great question, Duke. I decided to turn my response into a full blog post.

amber DeAnn
Reply

Thanks for the interesting article. I am organizing a weight loss meetup for this area and am looking for great weight loss information.

thanks amber

Sara
Reply

Glad to hear the info might be of interest to your group, Amber. Thanks for reading.

Accu-Ally
Reply

We utilize Wang ju-Yi’s book and theories at our college (Dragon Rises College of Oriental Medicine in Gainesville, FL) and have had Jason Robertson come and teach us, so I am familiar with this text and the theories-very useable information! I really appreciate your approach to this subject in that not everything works for everyone AND that you highlight the involvement of the TB and GB in digestion and metabolism! Nice article, thank you!

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