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How to Give Yourself Ear Acupressure

By Denise Cicuto

You should get into acupressure.

Acupressure is a free, easy, safe, and convenient way to alleviate symptoms and stay healthy. It can help with everything from stress reduction and boosting immunity to soothing travel ailments and getting rid of hangovers.

In addition to acupressure points on different parts of the body—many of which are covered in AcuTake’s Why Are You Doing That Point? series—there’s a whole microcosm of points inside your ear!

Similar to how foot reflexology targets points on the feet that correspond to body parts, in acupuncture, there is a map of the body inside the ear. Acupuncturists use these points for treating pain, digestive problems, smoking cessation, weight loss, generalized stress and anxiety, and other things.

While many acupuncturists use needles to treat points on the ear, another common method for treating ear acupuncture points is with ear seeds. You can use ear seeds on your own, so they’re a great DIY way to give your ears a little acupressure love. Keep reading

Digital Meridian Imaging Accelerates Acupuncture Diagnosis

By Sara Calabro

In the ongoing debate over whether and how acupuncture works, detractors lean heavily on the claim that you can’t actually see qi and therefore it must not be real. That’s no longer true.

AcuGraph, an imaging technology made by Miridia Acupuncture Technology, measures electrical skin resistance at acupuncture points to determine how well electricity, or qi, is flowing through the body. Based on those measurements, the AcuGraph software identifies potential patterns of disharmony and generates treatment recommendations to help correct the imbalances.

I recently met with Miridia’s founder and the inventor of AcuGraph, Adrian Larsen, to see AcuGraph with my own eyes. I was impressed. Keep reading

5 Common Running Injuries and How Acupuncture Can Help

By Ginna Ellis

Acupuncture and running are a well-suited pair.

Whether you’re a casual runner or a qualifying entrant in Monday’s Boston Marathon, acupuncture can help you stay on top of your running game. From knee and hip pain to plantar fasciitis and fatigue, many ailments suffered by runners can be helped by acupuncture.

Here is how acupuncture addresses the 5 most common causes of running injuries. Keep reading

Acupuncture Success Stories: Seasonal Allergy Relief

By Sara Calabro

A previous acupuncture success story, about an advertising professional suffering from tight hips, recently found its way around Twitter. It got me thinking that we should revisit the success-stories series.

Deidre, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, sought acupuncture for something many people are struggling with this time of year: seasonal allergies. Here’s her story.

Patient: Deidre
Age: 34
Location: Cambridge, MA
Acupuncturist: Practitioners at Acupuncture Together

What initially brought you to acupuncture?

I was looking for a solution to my horrible seasonal allergies and debilitating menstrual cramps after finding that Western medicine could offer more medications but not more relief. Keep reading

Why Are You Doing That Point? Gall Bladder 30

By Sara Calabro

This edition of Why Are You Doing That Point?, an ongoing series that explains popular acupuncture points, is about Gall Bladder 30, a key point used in treatments for hip and leg pain.

Gall Bladder 30—also known as Huantiao (Chinese name), Jumping Circle (English translation) and GB30 (acupuncturist lingo)—is located between your sacrum and greater trochanter.

In normal-speak, Gall Bladder 30 is usually found smack in the middle of your jeans back pocket (see picture below). Keep reading

Have You Heard of Gua Sha?

By Denise Cicuto

It’s not all about needles.

Gua sha is one of several non-needle tools in an acupuncturist’s arsenal. It’s often used in combination with needles, but gua sha is a therapy in its own right.

Gua sha is an East-Asian technique of scraping or stroking the skin using a device made of metal, bone, or horn. The scraping can be done on various parts of the body, and most often it’s done on the back and neck.

Here are answers to some commons questions about gua sha. Keep reading