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Chew on Acupuncture

By Sara Calabro

Acupuncture Is Like Noodles, the followup to Lisa Rohleder’s The Remedy, is another inspiring dive into the world of community acupuncture.

Rohleder is back with her tell-it-like-it-is style, never shying away from expressing distaste for the attitudes that she says are classist and at fault for acupuncture being primarily an upper-middle-class luxury.

Acupuncture education and treatments—offered according to the private-practice model, at $65 and up per session—are overpriced and irresponsible, says Rohleder, who effectively softens the blow of her many bold statements with a noodle metaphor.

The book’s title refers to the potential simplicity and widespread usefulness of acupuncture, if only it were available to larger and more diverse populations through models like the one Rohleder founded and fiercely champions. Keep reading

Pain Diagnosis Speaks to Docs

By Sara Calabro

Yoshito Mukaino wanted to talk shop with his colleagues. But the physician acupuncturist, in trying to discuss with fellow medical doctors how acupuncture alleviates pain, found himself without common language. Thus came the M-test, a diagnostic tool that’s easily explainable to mainstream clinicians. The M-test identifies from where in the body pain is stemming, allowing for precise, repeatable acupuncture treatments conducive to a hospital setting.

Mukaino is director of clinical East Asian medicine at Japan’s Fukuoka University Hospital, where acupuncture is a key component in patient care plans and in the curriculum—his M-test class is required for first-year medical students. He is making his second U.S. teaching appearance this October at Bastyr University. In response to demand from Western clinicians, the three-day seminar, formerly offered only to acupuncturists and naturopaths, is also open to medical doctors, osteopaths, chiropractors and nurse practitioners.

AcuTake recently caught up with Mukaino.
Keep reading

The Community ‘Remedy’

By Sara Calabro

The Remedy: Integrating Acupuncture Into American Healthcare is a little book—just over 100 pages—that packs a powerful punch.

Author Lisa Rohleder is the founder of Working Class Acupuncture, the first-ever community acupuncture clinic, located in Portland, OR. Rohleder, disenchanted with the traditional private-practice model of high prices for one-on-one sessions, opened her clinic in 2002 to cater to middle class people. “If you build it, they will come” was her mantra, and she was right. Keep reading

Acupuncture Enhances IVF

By Sara Calabro

Over Memorial Day weekend, singer Céline Dion became the best-known member of a fast-growing club: women who use acupuncture to improve their chances of having a baby. As research and success stories accumulate in its favor, infertility acupuncture is becoming an increasingly popular specialty.

AcuTake recently spoke with one such specialist, Caroline Radice, a New York City acupuncturist who has been helping women get pregnant for over 15 years.

Radice’s thorough understanding of both mainstream-Western and traditional-Chinese physiology informs acupuncture treatments that enable the best of both medicines. Working in coordination with OB/GYN physicians, Radice treats women (and men) throughout all stages of pregnancy. Keep reading

Plantar Fasciitis Indicates Soleus

By Sara Calabro

Barefoot running is all the rage. Although barefoot running dates back to the earliest of times, its modern popularity is attributed to the 2009 publication of Born to Run. The book focuses on a Mexican tribe that runs for miles, through treacherous terrain, in just thin sandals.

In the process of chronicling the tribe’s adventures, author Christopher McDougall discovers that barefoot running cures his chronic plantar fasciitis. But or runners who are still partial to shoes—or those who have tried barefoot running to no avail—acupuncture can be very effective for wiping out what McDougall calls “the vampire bite of running injuries.” Keep reading